Inter-University Centre Dubrovnik

An independent international centre for advanced studies

57 | The nonprofit sector, NGOs and civil society. <BR>International and global perspective

Duration
08 Jun 2003 - 13 Jun 2003
Language
English
Status
REGULAR
Course directors:
Helmut K. Anheier, London School of Economics & UCLA, United Kingdom
Gojko Bezovan, University of Zagreb, Croatia
William Parent, UCLA, United States
Filip Wijkstroen, Stockholm University, Sweden
Annette Zimmer, University of Münster, Germany
Course description:
The growth of nonprofit organisations as service providers in developed market economies, as vehicles of developmental and humanitarian assistance efforts in developing countries, and as instruments of government reform in former socialist countries, have moved the study of this set of institutions closer to the center of the public policy agenda. Parallel to this, the (re) discovery of civil society and the growing awareness among policymakers that the very social fabric of society is changing, both locally as well as internationally, have added to the importance of the 'third sector' as a panacea to counteract social disintegration and exclusion, and the decline of social capital and community more generally. The result of both policy developments has been that nonprofit organisations and civil society institutions are part of different debates that range from new public management approaches on the one hand to civil society and social capital approaches on the other. These debates, however, cast the role of nonprofit institutions in strikingly different ways, and may have contradictory policy implications.

This course will examine these policy debates about nonprofit organisations, civil society and social capital from theoretical and empirical perspectives across a wide range of countries and cultures, and economic and welfare systems. The course will be interdisciplinary and look at approaches in economics, sociology, political science and international relations, with an emphasis on policy analysis throughout.

The course will use a variety of instructional formats, e.g., lecture, seminar-type discussion, brief in-class exercises, and student presentations.

This IUC event is supported through a grant from Friedrich Naumann Stiftung.
Course lecturers:
David Lewis, London School of Economics and Political Science, London, United Kingdom