29 / THE 43RD FUTURE OF RELIGION


Reason and Religion

29 April – 4 May 2019   print this page

Course directors:

Rudolf J. Siebert, Western Michigan University, United States
Denis R.Janz, Loyola University, New Orleans, United States
Gottfried Küenzlen, University of Bundeswehr München, Germany
Mislav Kukoč, University Department of Croatian Studies, University of Zagreb, Croatia
Dinka Marinović-Jerolimov, Institute for Social Research, Zagreb, Croatia
Francis Brassard, Rochester Institute of Technology, Dubrovnik, Croatia
Michael R.Ott, Grand Valley State University, Allendale, United States


Course description:

Also our new discourse of 2019, like the previous ones, embraces both sides of the modern antagonism between the sacred and the profane, the religious and the secular, faith and autonomous reason, revelation and enlightenment. Religious as well as secular people have an ethics, which may motivate them in discourse: a communicative, or discourse ethics. All religious people share the Golden Rule. Many enlightened people share the translation and rationalization of the Golden Rule, i.e. the Kantian categorical imperative, or the Appelian and Habermasian communicative ethics, or the principle of the apriori of the unlimited communication community, and strive for personal autonomy and universal, i.e. anamnestic, present, and proleptic solidarity, in the on-going crisis-loaded transition situation between Modernity on one hand, and Post-Modernity, on the other. Our new discourse wants once more to bring together religious and secular people, who are interested in the question, what the religion and the secular enlightenment of the future, and their new interrelationship, may possibly and probably look like, on the basis of 42 years of research into the future of religion in the IUC, with the practical intent of cooperation concerning the solution of the present, often bloody and in any case most painful national and international struggle of faith powers, the faith in reason, science and technology, on one hand, and the faith in divine revelations, on the other. The struggle of faith powers produces continually culture wars, concerning such issues as separation of church, or umma, and state, stemcell research, gene-technological self - instrumentalization or even self-optimalization of humanity.We try to create a civilization not of death, but rather of life, or of love, or of mercy, as suggested by Pope Francis I , in remembrance of Saint Francis of Assissi, the greatest saint of the West, recognized by believers and non-believers alike. Organized science and the churches initiate and continue to carry out the conflict between the faith powers.The scientific side is afraid of religious obsurantism and a science - sceptical preservation of residuals of archaic feelings. The religious side turnes against the scientistic and positivistic faith in scientific and technological progress of a crude materialism and naturalism, which undermines the personal and social morality. Today continues the tension between reason - based, secular, civil society and religion. In our discourse, we want to explore, what a new religion and a new secular enlightenment may contribute to the moral improvement of individuals and nations: to a spiritual, as well as political, and economic revolution, or pro-volution, toward a truly humane civilization, instead of an inhuman barbarism. Religions can be born, and they can die. Religions survive, when they can resolve the theodicy problem on a certain level of evolution, or learning.They die, when they can no longer resolve the theodicy problem, theoretically and practically, on a certain level of evolution; like e.g. the trinitrian Persian Religion of Light and Darkness, or Good and Evil; or Hinduism as the trinitarian Religion of Imagination; or the Syrian Religion of Pain; or the trinitarian Egyptian Religion of Riddle; or the trinitarian Greek Religion of Fate and Beauty; or the tinitarian Roman Religion of Utility ; or the trinitarian Gothic Religion of Blood and Soil. We share with the humanistic theologian Hans Küng the conviction, that there can be no peace among nations without peace between the religions and the modern secular enlightenment movements. There can be no peace between religion and secular enlightenment without discourse between them. There can be no discourse between the religions and the secular enlightenment movements without foundational research in them concerning their mutual interpretation of reality, and their mutual orientation of action. What may a future new religion and a future new secular enlightenment, and their global ethos, committed to build and maintain a sustainable, peaceful world civilization, possibly and probably look like? Please, see our Road Map A.B. on the Siebert, website : http: //www.rudolfjsiebert. org/.

The call for papers can be downloaded here.


Course lecturers:

Rudolf J. Siebert, Western Michigan University, United States
Denis R.Janz, Loyola University, New Orleans, United States
Gottfried Küenzlen, University of Bundeswehr München, Germany
Mislav Kukoč, University Department of Croatian Studies, University of Zagreb, Croatia
Dinka Marinović-Jerolimov, Institute for Social Research, Zagreb, Croatia
Nikolina Hazdovac Bajić, Institute of Social Sciences Ivo Pilar, Zagreb, Croatia