23 / CRIME PREVENTION THROUGH CRIMINAL LAW & SECURITY STUDIES

12 – 16 March 2018        Send to printer


Course directors

Davor Derenčinović, University of Zagreb, Croatia
Anna-Maria Getoš Kalac, University of Zagreb, Croatia
Richard Farkas, DePaul University, Chicago, United States
Michael Kilchling, Max Planck Institut, Freiburg, Germany
Charles E. Tucker, World Engagement Institute, Chicago, United States


Course description:

“Innocence Projects”, primarily in the United States, but also in other countries where they have been introduced, allow persons convicted of crimes to have their cases re-examined in order to establish their innocence. In the United States there are various models of “Innocence Projects”. Regardless of the model, one of the key methods used to prove someone´s innocence is DNA testing. This method has resulted in the release of approximately 300 convicted persons in the USA. More importantly, the implementation of “Innocence Projects” leads to a re-examination and correction of errors within the judicial system, possibly resulting in the release of innocent convicted persons. In addition, in a large number of cases, the gathering of DNA evidence has led to the identification and conviction of the real perpetrator. This course examines whether “Innocence Projects”, especially those based on subsequent DNA expert testimony, to what extent innocent projects have been introduced in comparative jurisdictions as there is no reason why the development of science and the opportunities it brings should not find a wider application.

The course is open to interested participants from academia (undergraduate students in higher years of study, postgraduate students, doctoral candidates, junior researchers), practice (governmental institutions, courts, attorney offices, NGOs etc.), journalists and others. The working language is English; therefore proficiency in English is required.

The course format foresees the active involvement of participants through their participation in the moot court competition, as well as through the less formal discussions during the free time. Interested participants will have the possibility to present their own papers/PhD projects relevant to the topics before a competent panel of senior researchers and professionals. The number of participants will be limited to 40.

All participants are required to pay a 65€ course fee upon admission to the course via bank transfer. There are no additional fees to be paid. The fee includes the course venue costs, a welcome reception, a guided Dubrovnik sightseeing, high-speed Wi-Fi connection, use of IUC computers and printers, costs of materials distributed as well as other IUC facilities. The Faculty of Law, University of Zagreb will sponsor the costs of the selection process, academic materials, occasional snacks & drinks, certificates and rewards for winners in the moot court as well as best student presentation.

The participation/attendance certificate issued by the course director and IUC Dubrovnik is equivalent to 4 ECTS, also sponsored by the Faculty of Law, University of Zagreb. For covering travel and accomodation expensses, we strongly advise interested participants to contact their home institutions as well as other fundations that finance educational courses - we can provide interested participants with formal invitation letters if needed. The on-line application procedure will be open until the 1st March 2017. For further questions please contact the Course coordinator Dr Aleksandar Marsavelski (aleksandar.marsavelski@pravo.hr).


Course lecturers

Sunčana Roksandić Vidlička, University of Zagreb, Croatia
Marta Dragičević Prtenjača, University of Zagreb, Croatia
Hans-Joerg Albrecht, Max Planck Institut, Freiburg, Germany
Steven Becker, DePaul University, Chicago, United States
Andrej Bozhinovsk, Law Faculty "Justinianus Primus" - Skopje. R. Macedonia, Macedonia
Richard Farkas, DePaul University, Chicago, United States
Michael Kilchling, Max Planck Institut, Freiburg, Germany
Laurell OLa H., Council of Europe, Sweden
Besa Arifi, South East European University, Tetovo , Macedonia
Majid Ghourchi-Beigi, Kharazmi University, Iran
Brian Howe, University of Cincinnati, United States


Work Schedule

Sunday, March 11

Arrival of participants

Monday, March 12

09.30 - 10.30 IUC Registration

10.30 - 11.15 Welcome and Introduction: Davor Derenčinović (University of Zagreb, Croatia)

11.15 - 11.30 Coffee break

11.30 - 12.00 Richard Farkas (De Paul University, Chicago): The Political Fallout from Innocence Projects

12.00 - 12.30 Hans-Jörg Albrecht (Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Germany): Wrongful convictions - causes, consequences, remedies

12.30 – 13.00 Discussion

13.00 - 13.30 IUC Reception

13.30 - 14.30 Lunch break

14.30 - 15.30 Steven Becker (Law Office, United States of America): Introduction to the Moot Court Case

15:30 - Dubrovnik Sightseeing

Tuesday, March 13

10.00 - 10.30 Davor Derenčinović, Sunčana Roksandić Vidlička, Marta Dragičević Prtenjača (University of Zagreb, Croatia): Innocence Projects and Subsequent DNA Testing in Croatia: A Possible Reality or an Unattainable Desire

10:30 – 10:45 Discussion

10,45 - 11,15 Dragan Primorac (Pennsylvania State University / University of New Haven): The future of forensic genetics

11:15 – 11:30 Discussion

11.30 - 11.45 Coffee break

11. 45 - 12.15 Besa Arifi (South East European University): The importance of innocence projects in Macedonia in regard to solving the problem of politically motivated trials

12.15 - 12.30 Discussion

12.30 - 14.00 Lunch break

14.00 - 15.30 Student Presentations

Wednesday, March 14

10.00 - 10.30 Martina Cagossi (University of Rome III, Italy): The Italy Innocence Project and wrongful conviction: National framework and European perspective

10:30 – 10:45 Discussion

10,45 - 11,15 Ola Hermann Laurell (Group of Experts on Action against Trafficking in Human Beings, GRETA): Acquittal after final force in Swedish Criminal Justice

11:15 – 11:30 Discussion

11.30 - 11.45 Coffee break

11. 45 - 12.15 Michael Kilchling (Max Planck Institute for Foreign and International Criminal Law, Germany): Standards of compensation for undue detention in Europe

12.15 - 12.30 Discussion

12.30 - 14.00 Lunch break

14.00 - 18.00 Moot Court Team Preparations

Thursday, March 15

10.00 - 10.30 Brian Howe (University of Cincinnati, USA): Ohio Innocence Project

10:30 – 10:45 Discussion

10.45 - 11.15 Steven Becker (Law Office, United States of America): Post-Conviction DNA Testing, Actual Innocence, and Cold Cases

11:15 – 11:30 Discussion

11.30 - 11.45 Coffee break

11. 45 - 12.15 Aleksandar Marsavelski (University of Zagreb, Croatia): Political Trials against Political Parties

12.15 - 12.30 Discussion

12.30 - 14.00 Lunch break

14.00 - 15.45 Moot Court Competition

15.45 - 16.00 Coffe Break

16.00 - 17.45 Moot Court Competition

Friday, March 16

10.30 - 11.00 Xhemali Saiti (Macedonian Association of Judges / Supreme Court of Macedonia): Wrongful Conviction in Macedonia

11.00 - 11.30 Jamshid Gholamloo (University of Tehran, Iran): Wrongful conviction in the criminal justice system of Iran

11:30 – 12:00 Discussion

12.00 - 13.00 Lunch break

13.00 - 15.00 Moot Court Competition - Final

15.00 - 15.30 Aleksandar Marsavelski (University of Zagreb, Croatia): Course Conclusions

15:30 - 16:00 Distribution of Certificates

Saturday, March 17

Departure of participants


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